Shabads

The holiest scripture in Sikhi, the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, is an anthology of shabads (hymns). The Guru emphasizes the importance of experiencing God through song and sound. While it helps to know the meaning of a shabad, the melody alone is often enough to convey the spirit of bliss embedded in the holy verses. Below is a random sampling of some of my favorite renditions of Shabad Gurbani. Make your own playlist and play it in the background while your kids are busy doing a holiday activity. If your children don't understand the words, explain the wisdom of the shabad and teach them how they can apply it to their own lives.

This is the "root formula" or creedal statement of all Sikh theology. It's considered to end with the word 'Gurprasad' but this rendition adds a few extra verses.
God as the great unseen giver is the main theme of this shabad. But what should we ask for, when nothing is permanent except God?
The main theme of this shabad is about the protection of God, compassion, unity, and the removal of obstacles.
Steeped in mysticism, this shabad is about the transient and ephemeral nature of this world and how God is the only permanence we can count on.
The main theme of this shabad is about the infinite greatness of God who is immaculate, formless, and beyond words.
The main theme of this shabad is about keeping God in your mind at all times and accepting his will as sweet and perfect
The main theme of this shabad is about understanding that all joy, contentment, and peace are gained through God's mercy alone.
The main theme of this shabad is that the entire universe is God's temple and divine inspiration can be found in the natural world.
The main theme of this shabad is that people of the world may express their devotion to God in different ways, but the basic underlying path is the same.
Sung in first person, the main theme of this shabad is that God has covered my sins with his grace, he has saved me even though I am unworthy.